September 2, 2014

thatkidwiththenaps:

crownprince81:

pastel-gizibe:

yung-nile:

sarajevomoja:

faleeshm0:

taint3ed:

chinaija:

brownglucose:

care free black boys

aww i love this!

YOOOOOOO THAT WAS LIVEEEEEEEE

LOVE THISSS. <3

freakin adorable

CUTIESSSSSSSSSS

That last part though! Get itttttt

Love it

This is how young black boys should be living!

(Source: vibes-and-simplicity, via dynastylnoire)

September 2, 2014

mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers:

tashabilities:

thewrongoil:

indigovioletpurple:

Sorry could you repeat that

But Rooney and Trey Songz are the same age

Our bodies are biologically older because of life under STRUCTURAL INEQUALITY.

Scratching and surviving ages your body.

The GOOD news is that melanin keeps us from LOOKING like it.

WE DON’T LOOK LIKE WHAT WE BEEN THROUGH!

We def mentally age faster and we got way worse health due to stress but at least we look good

(via dynastylnoire)

September 2, 2014
thotstothinkabout:


storiesandconjure:

the-friction-in-your-jeans:

Raven-Symoné just posted this image on her Facebook and polish, it’s made me MAD. This is what I write about it on Facebook:
——————————-
As an African this image is infuriating to me personally.
1) Africa is a continent, not a country
2) Africa has prosperous, beautiful big cities with wealthy, comfortable, happy people as well as people in dire states of need.
THERE ARE EMPOVERISHED PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD AND THEY ALL NEED OUR HELP. This common image of Africa as ‘Land of the Charity Cases’ makes me furious. You think of Africa and it’s all pitiful starving children, tears, hands extended, begging for your spare change and off cuts. I feel like Western Asia often gets tarred with the same brush. Charity is needed in Africa like it us needed in Asia, Europe, The Americas, Australasia, all over the world. I’m not saying STOP giving to charity I’m just saying that there are millions of people rich and poor in Africa and they demand respect not pity. We aren’t begging for your damned ice water, we are looking for ways to build pumps and wells in our villages. We don’t wan the food your child won’t finish at the table, we want the means to grow and buy our own. Africa is striving for Education, improved infrastructure, to create wealth for all of us that desire it, to create a future that isn’t war torn and tumultuous. We are more than just your ‘I’m such a good person’ trump card, we are millions of lives and languages and backgrounds and faces that are all grouped together, called primitive, with our hands twisted to look outstretched and begging.

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT. 
According to an IRIN report in 2005, 82% of arable land in South Africa is still owned by Europeans and those of European descent through colonization.
Yet a lot of people be giving away dresses and bibles to “Africa” as a sum of thinking that is going to solve the problems persisting in specific countries in Africa.
Can we stop homogenizing the experiences of an entire continent for white saviour complexes please?

You are not helping the situations long term, and you are also continueing the racist perpetuation of Africans as “backwards”, “starving”, and “unable to fend for themselves”. When they are very much able to do so if it wasn’t for colonization and white supremacy, which you continue to perpetuate through unsustainable aid, and painting the picture of the “poor Africans”.
http://www.irinnews.org/report/54617/south-africa-land-ownership-remains-racially-skewed


Bottom commentary on point^^^^ 

thotstothinkabout:

storiesandconjure:

the-friction-in-your-jeans:

Raven-Symoné just posted this image on her Facebook and polish, it’s made me MAD. This is what I write about it on Facebook:

——————————-

As an African this image is infuriating to me personally.

1) Africa is a continent, not a country

2) Africa has prosperous, beautiful big cities with wealthy, comfortable, happy people as well as people in dire states of need.

THERE ARE EMPOVERISHED PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD AND THEY ALL NEED OUR HELP. This common image of Africa as ‘Land of the Charity Cases’ makes me furious. You think of Africa and it’s all pitiful starving children, tears, hands extended, begging for your spare change and off cuts. I feel like Western Asia often gets tarred with the same brush. Charity is needed in Africa like it us needed in Asia, Europe, The Americas, Australasia, all over the world. I’m not saying STOP giving to charity I’m just saying that there are millions of people rich and poor in Africa and they demand respect not pity. We aren’t begging for your damned ice water, we are looking for ways to build pumps and wells in our villages. We don’t wan the food your child won’t finish at the table, we want the means to grow and buy our own. Africa is striving for Education, improved infrastructure, to create wealth for all of us that desire it, to create a future that isn’t war torn and tumultuous. We are more than just your ‘I’m such a good person’ trump card, we are millions of lives and languages and backgrounds and faces that are all grouped together, called primitive, with our hands twisted to look outstretched and begging.

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT. 

According to an IRIN report in 2005, 82% of arable land in South Africa is still owned by Europeans and those of European descent through colonization.

Yet a lot of people be giving away dresses and bibles to “Africa” as a sum of thinking that is going to solve the problems persisting in specific countries in Africa.

Can we stop homogenizing the experiences of an entire continent for white saviour complexes please?

You are not helping the situations long term, and you are also continueing the racist perpetuation of Africans as “backwards”, “starving”, and “unable to fend for themselves”. When they are very much able to do so if it wasn’t for colonization and white supremacy, which you continue to perpetuate through unsustainable aid, and painting the picture of the “poor Africans”.

http://www.irinnews.org/report/54617/south-africa-land-ownership-remains-racially-skewed

Bottom commentary on point^^^^ 

(via iphotographlove)

September 2, 2014

asylum-art:

Leandro Erlich - Swimming Pool

Leandro Erlich, Argentina b.1973

Swimming pool 2010 Timber, swimming pool ladder, plexiglass an water

“An extraordinary and visually confounding installation…Erlich constructed a full-size pool, complete with all its trappings, including a deck and a ladder.

When approached from the first floor, visitors were confronted with a surreal scene: people, fully clothed, can be seen standing, walking, and breathing beneath the surface of the water.

It was only when visitors entered the Duplex gallery from the basement that they recognized that the pool is empty, its construction a visual trick fashioned by the artist.

A large, continuous piece of acrylic spanned the pool and suspended water above it, creating the illusion of a standard swimming pool that was both disorienting and humorous.”

(via zazou02)

September 2, 2014

thorki:

acexlove:

one of the greatest pixar moments; a family thats ok with you coming 2nd 

they were hiding their identities as superheros not making a statement

(Source: attackoncat, via atasteforlife24)

September 2, 2014
"Never be afraid to apologize to your child. If you lose your temper and say something in anger that wasn’t meant to be said, apologize. Children need to know that adults can admit when they are wrong."

American Humane Society (via maninsun)

This is so, so important.

(via foundbysara)

i have a list of things i’m still waiting for apologies for

(via transgirlsatan)

(via witchsistah)

September 2, 2014

perspectave:

how many followers do I need until I get random anons asking me how my day was?

(via egalitarian-datakeeper)

September 2, 2014

(Source: feministcorna, via jackwhitesguitar)

September 2, 2014
randompandemonium:


soprie:

actionables:

hmm, yoga is kind of girly #nohomo let’s rename it so it sounds manlier and make it just for the bros for the bros only

WHY DO MEN NEED TO REBRAND EVERYTHING TOUCHED BY WOMEN?
SIT DOWN AND EAT YOUR YOGURT AND SALAD AND DO YOUR YOGA

FOLLOW UP YOUR INTENSE BROGA SESSION WITH SOME BROGURT AND A BRAH-LAD

randompandemonium:

soprie:

actionables:

hmm, yoga is kind of girly #nohomo
let’s rename it so it sounds manlier and make it just for the bros
for the bros only

WHY DO MEN NEED TO REBRAND EVERYTHING TOUCHED BY WOMEN?

SIT DOWN AND EAT YOUR YOGURT AND SALAD AND DO YOUR YOGA

FOLLOW UP YOUR INTENSE BROGA SESSION WITH SOME BROGURT AND A BRAH-LAD

(via jackwhitesguitar)

September 2, 2014

jackwhitesguitar:

thymoss:

railroadsoftware:

no one ever says that Rome needed help from aliens to build their empire

#l laughed for days when i found out that #ancient egyptians used water to reduce friction and move blocks for distances #and that this was literally DEPICTED ON THEIR HIEROGLYPHICS #but ~western archaeologists~ #thought that the pouring of water depicted ~superstitious rituals~ #jfc

😭

September 2, 2014
mindblowingscience:


When science meets aboriginal oral history


In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.
They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.
But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.
This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.
The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.
“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.
It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.
In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.
“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”
He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.
“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.
“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”



Continue Reading.

mindblowingscience:

When science meets aboriginal oral history

In Inuit oral history, the Tuniit loom both large and small.

They inhabited the Arctic before the Inuit came, and they were a different stock of people — taller and stronger, with the muscularity of polar bears, the stories say. A Tuniit man could lift a 1,000 pound seal on his back, or drag a whole walrus. Others say the Tuniit slept with their legs in the air to drain the blood from their feet and make them lighter, so they could outrun a caribou.

But despite their superior strength and size, the Tuniit were shy. They were “easily put to flight and it was seldom heard that they killed others,” according to one storyteller in the book “Uqalurait: An Oral History of Nunavut.” The Inuit took over the best hunting camps and displaced the conflict-averse Tuniit. Soon enough, these strange people disappeared from the land.

This week, the prestigious journal Science published an unprecedented paleogenomic study that resolves long-held questions about the people of the prehistoric Arctic. By analyzing DNA from 169 ancient human specimens from Canada, Alaska, Siberia, and Greenland, the researchers concluded that a series of Paleo-Eskimo cultures known as the Pre-Dorset and Dorset were actually one population who lived with great success in the eastern Arctic for 4,000 years — until disappearing suddenly a couple generations after the ancestors of the modern Inuit appeared, around 1200 A.D. There is no evidence the two groups interbred.

The Dorset are almost certainly the Tuniit of Inuit oral history.

“The outcome of the genetic analysis is completely in agreement, namely that the Paleo-Eskimos are a different people,” says Eske Willerslev, a co-author of the Science study.

It’s not the first time his genomic research has synchronized neatly with indigenous oral traditions.

In February, when Willerslev and colleagues announced they had sequenced the genome of a 12,500-year-old skeleton found in Montana, the results showed that nearly all South and North American indigenous populations were related to this ancient American. Shane Doyle, a member of the Crow tribe of Montana, said at the time: “This discovery basically confirms what tribes have never really doubted — that we’ve been here since time immemorial, and that all the artifacts and objects in the ground are remnants of our direct ancestors.” The sequenced genome of an Aboriginal from Australia also revealed findings in line with the local communities’ oral histories, Willerslev says.

“Scientists are sitting around and academically discussing different theories about peopling of Americas, and you have all these different views on how many migrations, and who is related to,” he says. “Then when we actually undertake the most sophisticated genetic analysis we can do today, and this is state of the art, genetically — we could have just have listened to them in the first place.”

He was laughing when he said that. But he and many others are serious when they say that scientists need to revaluate the weight they give traditional indigenous knowledge.

“This is a pretty common theme. It’s really surprising that scientists and general commentators don’t appreciate the knowledge collection and transmission of indigenous peoples, given the wealth of knowledge about medicine, physiology, geology, earth sciences, wind patterns, ice fluctuations — the incredible scope of knowledge that indigenous people have and have sustained them in North America for tens of thousands of years,” says Hayden King, director of the Centre for Indigenous Governance at Ryerson University and a member of the Beausoleil First Nation on Georgian Bay.

“It defies logic that this knowledge they’ve generated and transmitted wouldn’t be accurate and helpful in myriad ways.”

(via iphotographlove)

September 2, 2014

wreckamic:

I am in love with Eartha Kitt!
We miss you.

(via nisha-kay)

September 1, 2014

(via vikova)